Plain Bob Minor and Grandsire Triples - Ringing by the Treble

Introduction

This page assumes you already know the order of work for Plain Bob Minor and/or Grandsire Triples. No matter how well you have learned the order of work, it is very useful to know where you pass the treble to give additional information for those moments when you get lost. Everyone makes mistakes at some time, so the more signposts you know the better for navigating your way through the method. As you learn more complicated methods, learning certain places where you pass the treble becomes increasingly useful. Initially, being able to spot the other ropes (known as ropesight) is not easy but it is something you can gradually learn by standing behind another ringer when you are not ringing. And if you know (after reading this page) where to expect to meet the treble, that will also help you acquire some ropesight.

Once again, for Grandsire, think of the treble as being a “thick treble” ie treble plus hunt bell which you pass consecutively.

How it Works (theory)

The theory is very simple. You know that in Plain Bob and in Grandsire all the working bells plain hunt except when the treble leads, and at that point the working bells either dodge or make a place over the treble. Now, as a working bell hunts up from the front towards the back, it will pass the treble at some point as the treble hunts down towards the front. The sooner you meet the treble, the sooner it will get to the front and the sooner the working bells will need to dodge. The later you meet the treble, the later it will get to the front and the later the working bells will need to dodge.

In detail

Have a look at these blue lines and let’s assume you are ringing the 6th. I have put the lines horizontally to show more easily that the logic is the same for both Grandsire Triples and Plain Bob Minor. Click here to print these diagrams.

Grandsire Triples


Plain Bob Minor

Looking at the middle of the diagrams, after leading, if the treble is the first bell you meet it will “turn you from the lead” so you must make the place straight away (in 2nds for Plain Bob or in 3rds for Grandsire).

After leading, if you meet just one bell before the treble, you can go only one more place after passing the treble before it leads and before you dodge. This will be in the first possible place (3-4 up for Plain Bob or 4-5 up for Grandsire).

After leading, if you meet two bells before the treble, you can go only two more place after passing the treble before it leads and before you dodge. This will be in the second possible place (5-6 up for Plain Bob or 6-7 up for Grandsire).

After leading, if you meet three bells before the treble, you can go three more place after passing the treble before it leads and before you dodge. This will be in the third possible place (5-6 down for Plain Bob or 6-7 down for Grandsire). I think this is the hardest one!

After leading, if the treble (or “thick treble” for Grandsire) is the last bell you meet, you lie behind then follow it down dodging in the last possible place (3-4 down for Plain Bob or 4-5 down for Grandsire).

That is all there is to it and you can work out how to extend these tips for the additional dodges in Plain Bob Major and Grandsire Caters. But remember that in Plain Bob you dodge back at backstroke, whereas in Grandsire you dodge back at handstroke.

Hearing the Treble Lead

In Grandsire, the treble will give you a very useful indication of when to dodge if you can hear it lead; having the highest sounding note this is not too difficult. If you study the lines above you will see that the treble leads at handstroke (ping) then at backstroke (ping), just as you are about to dodge at the next handstroke. This is particularly useful when ringing on a higher number of bells (eg Caters) because the time between dodges is longer and it is easier to forget what you did last time. In theory, you might be able to do a similar thing in Plain Bob if you can hear the treble in seconds place (at backstroke) and its first blow leading (at handstroke), but this is more difficult unless you have a well trained musical ear.



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, June 2020