St Simon’s, St Martin’s and St Clement’s

St Simon’s Bob Doubles

This Doubles method has two bells dodging on the front while the other two working bells do something similar to Plain Bob Doubles above them but turning round in 3rds place instead of going to the front. The lead ends are the same as Plain Bob Doubles with 2nds place being made, two bells dodging in 3-4 and a bell making long 5ths. But if you study the plain course, you will see that the work at the lead end comes in the reverse order to Plain Bob. That is:

2nds;
dodge 3-4 up (to become 3rds place bell);
make four blows behind (to become 5ths place bell);
dodge 3-4 down (to become 4ths place bell);
2nds (to become 2nds place bell);
etc.

Bobs are the same as for Plain Bob and there are no Singles.

How to ring St Simon’s

Like learning any other method, you need to know the blue line. It is important to know the place bell order (2, 3, 5, 4, etc.), which is related to the order of the work at the lead end. But there are two useful tips too.

When hunting down from the back, you might be unsure whether or not to make 3rds and go back up. If you study the plain course you will see that if the treble is above you when you come down, you make 3rds place and go back up. If the treble is below you, it will be leading by the time you get to thirds place so you dodge 3-4 down to become 4ths place bell. And then you go in to double dodge on the front.

You might also be unsure how many dodges to do on the front (in 1-2). If you look at the blue line, you will see that for each dodge on the front, one of the other working bells makes 3rds. There are four working bells, two of them are dodging on the front and the other two bells make 3rds in turn – so there are two dodges on the front.

Also, if you have some knowledge of what is meant by coursing order, it can be very comforting to note that the bells come up to the back (to lie in 5ths place) in the coursing order AND they go down to the front (to lead) in the coursing order, this sequence being interrupted by the treble at some point.

St Martin’s Bob Doubles

This is a trivial variation on St Simon’s where, the double dodge on the front is replaced by the two bells involved making 2nds place over each other once. This leading and making seconds occupies the same number of rows as the dodging in St Simon’s, and the two methods are otherwise identical.

St Clement’s College Bob Minor

This is a six bell version of St Simon’s Bob Doubles as can be seen from the plain course here. (It “ought” to be called St Simon’s Bob Minor but another method uses that name.) St Clement’s follows exactly the same logic as St Simon’s, with the work at the lead end being the same as for Plain Bob Minor but in the opposite order. That is:

2nds;
dodge 3-4 up (to become 3rds place bell);
dodge 5-6 up (to become 5ths place bell);
dodge 5-6 down (to become 6ths place bell);
dodge 3-4 down (to become 4ths place bell);
2nds (to become 2nds place bell);
etc.

How to ring St Clement’s

The same logic applies as for St Simon’s concerning whether or not to make 3rds place and back. However, as there is one extra working bell making 3rds place, there is one extra dodge on the front (making three in total). And the same “coursing order friendly” features apply for the bells coming to the back and to the front.

Touches

Bobs and Singles are the same as for Plain Bob Minor. The diagrams below show the last lead of a plain course, and what happens when a bob or a single is called just before it would come round.

 

-H signifies a bob at “Home” ie when the tenor is in 6ths place, its home position in rounds.

You will see that bells 5 and 6 are unaffected but bells 2, 3 and 4 have changed places with each other as follows:

Bell 2 – instead of making 2nds place, it “runs out” ie it plain hunts to become 3rds place bell;
Bell 3 – instead of dodging 3-4 up, it “makes the bob” ie it strikes two blows in 4ths place to become 4ths place bell;
Bell 4 – instead of dodging 3-4 down, it “runs in” ie it plain hunts to become 2nds place bell.

So, three bells are affected by a bob and instead of striking in the order 234 they strike in the order 423.

sH signifies a single at “Home” ie when the tenor is in 6ths place, its home position in rounds.

You will see that bells 2, 5 and 6 are unaffected, and that bells 3 and 4 have changed places with each other as follows:

Bell 2 – is unaffected, it makes 2nds place;
Bell 3 – instead of dodging 3-4 up, it strikes two blows in 4ths place to become 4ths place bell, just as for a bob;
Bell 4 - instead of dodging 3-4 down, it strikes two blows in 3rds place to become 3rds place bell (and then hunts back up).

So, just two bells are affected by a single and instead of striking in the order 234 they strike in the order 243.

Lead End Place Notation

In summary, the three possible place notations for the lead end change are the same as for Plain Bob:

Plain Lean End  12
Bob Lead End  14
Single Lead End  1234

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, June 2020